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Migraine Linked To Blood clots In Veins

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Updated: Saturday, Apr 25,2009, 8:51:31 PM
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People with migraines May also be more likely to develop blood clots in their veins, according to a study published in the September 16 U.S. journal Neurology. 
In the condition known as venous thrombosis, in the form of blood clots in a vein, which tcmwell.com

People with migraines May also be more likely to develop blood clots in their veins, according to a study published in the September 16 U.S. journal Neurology. In the condition known as venous thrombosis, in the form of blood clots in a vein, which ...




People with migraines May also be more likely to develop blood clots in their veins, according to a study published in the September 16 U.S. journal Neurology.
In the condition known as venous thrombosis, in the form of blood clots in a vein, which can restrict blood flow and cause swelling and pain. These clots can then dislodge from the vein and travel to the heart and lungs, which can be fatal. 
 

For the study, 574 people in Italy until the age of 55 were interviewed to determine if they had a history of migraine or migraine at the time of evaluation and their medical records were reviewed for cases of venous thrombosis. The arteries in the neck and thighs were scanned with ultrasounds to check the hardening of the arteries.

Among the participants, 111 people had migraine. A total of 21 individuals also had migraines with one or more instances of venous thrombosis, or 19 percent. In comparison, 35 people without migraine had the condition, or 8 percent.

Researchers do not know why migraine and venous thrombosis are linked. One theory is that the blood of people with migraine May be more prone to clotting.

The study also revealed that people with migraines are more likely to have hardening or narrowing of the arteries, which is contrary to current theory.

"The thought was that because people with migraine are more likely to have strokes and other cardiovascular problems, they also have more severe and early atherosclerosis," said Stefan study author Kiechler Medical University of Innsbruck in Austria. "This is the first study to use high-resolution ultrasound to examine this theory, and it provides solid evidence to refute it."

Migraine

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