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Heart Defect Cause Certain Migraines?

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Updated: Friday, May 15,2009, 5:41:40 PM
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Investigators of the Heart Institute Jefferson and the Jefferson Headache Center participants are enrolled in a blinded study to determine if the closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO), a small hole or flap that allows the blood to move between the leftcmwell.com

Investigators of the Heart Institute Jefferson and the Jefferson Headache Center participants are enrolled in a blinded study to determine if the closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO), a small hole or flap that allows the blood to move between the lef...


 
Investigators of the Heart Institute Jefferson and the Jefferson Headache Center participants are enrolled in a blinded study to determine if the closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO), a small hole or flap that allows the blood to move between the left and right sides of the heart, can stop migraines. In newborns, the PFO closes at or shortly after birth, but 20 percent of adults, the gap remains open to some degree.

Researchers of the heart and headaches at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital are combining efforts to determine if a heart defect May be caused by certain types of migraines.


Over 28 million Americans suffer from migraines. Debilitating migraines cause serious disturbances in the individual life and cost billions of dollars in lost work, school and medical treatment each year. More than a quarter of the population who struggle with migraines have the heart defect.

Most people who have a PFO are never screened for it because doctors rarely suspect it of causing health problems but new evidence suggests that individuals with PFO are more susceptible to migraine. This sensitivity is considered to be due to the adoption of the document on the right side of the heart to the left side of the heart through the PFO. Blood and material that travels through the PFO is not filtered or oxygenated and in this form in May Trip to the brain, which may trigger changes in blood vessels that underlies migraine.

"The stroke, for example, are sometimes triggered when blood clots passing through the PFO Explore the brain," said a leading investigator of the study, David Fischman, MD, Co-Director cardiology laboratory Catherization Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, and Associate Professor of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University.

"Until now, cardiologists have told us that patients with migraine better when they have their PFO closed for other reasons," said Stephen Silberstein, MD, director of the Jefferson Headache Center, Study other principal investigator.

"We must be able to prove that the closure of a PFO by itself in fact to reduce migraines," said Silberstein, a professor of neurology, Jefferson.

In this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. A group submitted to a minimally invasive procedure to close the PFO. An interventional cardiologist inserts a catheter into the heart and release a device that forms a seal around the PFO to prevent poor circulation. Generally, the procedure lasts one to two hours under local anesthesia.

The other group will not have their PFO closed but will undergo a procedure that simulates the closure and continue their medical migraines. But none of the participants knew which group they were assigned. However, all participants receive the same post-operative care and leave the hospital within 24 hours.

Migraines

Tags: Heart Migraines

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