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Shaoyang syndrome

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Updated: Tuesday, Sep 01,2009, 1:00:46 PM
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Shaoyang syndrome refers to the syndrome due to pathogenic factors attacking the gallbladder. This syndrome is usually caused by internal invasion of pathogenic factors into the gallbladder when the taiyang disease is not relieved yet. The struggle between healthy qi and pathogenic factors in the external and internal causes shaoyang syndrome. Or it may be caused by direct invasion of pathogenic factors into shaoyang.

Clinical manifestations: Alternate chills and fever, chest and hypochondriac discomfort and fullness, no appetite, vexation and susceptibility to vomiting, bitter taste in the mouth and dry throat, dizziness and taut pulse.

Analysis of the symptoms: Alternate chills and fever is due to struggle between healthy qi and pathogenic factors in the external and internal in which predomination of healthy qi leads to fever and predomination of pathogenic factors results in cold; chest and hypochondriac discomfort and fullness is caused by stagnation of pathogenic factors in shaoyang meridian which circulates along the rib-sides; no appetite and vomiting are caused by gallbladder heat invading the stomach and preventing the stomach qi from normal descent; vexation is due to stagnation of heat; bitter taste in the mouth, dry throat and dizziness are caused by upward migration of gallbladder heat along the meridian;taut pulse is the sign of shaoyang disorder.

Tags: Syndrome Shaoyang

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